DNS servers are the “yellow pages” “phone book” of the internet.

Whoever is running DNS servers get’s to know all queries send (what client is requesting and probably connecting to what address… basically: what websites the user have visited, this is very private sensitive data, so DNS servers need to be trustworthy use encryption and respect user’s privacy)

https://dnsprivacy.org/wiki/display/DP/DNS+Privacy+Test+Servers

what DNS server should user use?

it’s a hard choice.

most users probably simply go with whatever the vendor of their router or ISP provider seems fit. (in the case of StarLink that would be Google’s DNS 8.8.8.8).

Of course a user does (usually) not type “185.222.222.222” into one’s browser.

no the user just types: https://dns.sb

(or yahoo.com or domain.com)

the DNS software then asks the nearby (usually router) “what ‘phone number’ (ip) does domain yahoo.com have?”

If the router does not know, the router will ask again the DNS server that either the user pre-configured or the internet service provider pre-conigured. (usually on port 53 (the server side software most used under GNU Linux is BIND))

So yes – the DNS server is a very important part of the internet.

Also: the DNS server “knows” all the sites a user might contact (because the user-program is asking it for the ‘phone number’ (ip) of yahoo.com)

So it is critical if a user does not want to be mass surveillance spied on to pick a ethic DNS server. (not easy, who is running what? and: will it log all user’s lookups?)

some public dns servers:

nice explanation video: why privacy protecting DNS servers-resolver are important: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=olW9jtOMMSI

(alphabetical order, no preference!)

new list:

https://wiki.ipfire.org/dns/public-servers

List of Public DNS Servers

This is a list of publicly available DNS servers suitable for use with IPFire. They are operated by many different organisations in many different countries. Please consider carefully which ones you would like to use.

DNS Servers that support UDP/TCP

host 116.202.176.26 https://libredns.gr/

Operator Address(es) Hostname
Anycast
C1VHosting 152.89.170.250
152.89.170.250
152.89.170.251
2a0e:97c0:210::250
censurfridns.dk 91.239.100.100 anycast.uncensoreddns.org
2002:d596:2a92:1:71:53::
Cloudflare 1.1.1.1 cloudflare-dns.com
1.0.0.1
2606:4700:4700::1111
2606:4700:4700::1001
dns.sb 185.222.222.222 dns.sb
185.184.222.222
2a09::
2a09::1
Hurricane Electric 74.82.42.42
2001:470:20::2
Google Public Free DNS 8.8.8.8 dns.google
8.8.4.4
Germany (DE)
Lightning Wire Labs 81.3.27.54 recursor01.dns.ipfire.org
2001:678:b28::54
81.3.27.54 recursor01.dns.lightningwirelabs.com
2001:678:b28::54
Denmark (DK)
censurfridns.dk 89.233.43.71 unicast.uncensoreddns.org
2a01:3a0:53:53::
Spain (ES)
puntCAT 109.69.8.51
France (FR)
French Data Network (FDN) 80.67.169.12
80.67.169.40
2001:910:800::12
2001:910:800::40
Netherlands (NL)
Freenom World 80.80.80.80
80.80.81.81
United Kingdom (UK)
CyberGhost 194.187.251.67
United States (US)
Alternate DNS 198.101.242.72
23.253.163.53
Comcast / Xfinity 75.75.75.75
75.75.76.76
CyberGhost 38.132.106.139
Neustar DNS Advantage 156.154.70.1
156.154.71.1
Sprintlink General DNS 204.117.214.10
199.2.252.10
204.97.212.10
Verisign 64.6.64.6
64.6.65.6

DNS-over-TLS service

Operator Address(es) DNS over TLS Hostname
Anycast
censurfridns.dk 91.239.100.100 anycast.uncensoreddns.org
2002:d596:2a92:1:71:53::
Cloudflare 1.1.1.1 cloudflare-dns.com
1.0.0.1
2606:4700:4700::1111
2606:4700:4700::1001
Freifunk München e.V. 5.1.66.255 anycast01.ffmuc.net
2001:678:e68:f000::
5.1.66.255 dot.ffmuc.net
2001:678:e68:f000::
dns.sb 185.222.222.222 dns.sb
185.184.222.222
2a09::
2a09::1
Google Public Free DNS 8.8.8.8 dns.google
8.8.4.4
Austria (AT)
Foundation for Applied Privacy 146.255.56.98 dot1.applied-privacy.net
2a01:4f8:c0c:83ed::1
Canada (CA)
CMRG DNS 199.58.81.218 dns.cmrg.net
2001:470:1c:76d::53
Switzerland (CH)
Digitale Gesellschaft Schweiz 185.95.218.42 dns.digitale-gesellschaft.ch
185.95.218.43
2a05:fc84::42
2a05:fc84::43
post-factum 140.238.215.192 dot.post-factum.tk
Germany (DE)
Digitalcourage e.V. 5.9.164.112 dns3.digitalcourage.de
Lightning Wire Labs 81.3.27.54 recursor01.dns.ipfire.org
2001:678:b28::54
81.3.27.54 recursor01.dns.lightningwirelabs.com
2001:678:b28::54
Denmark (DK)
censurfridns.dk 89.233.43.71 unicast.uncensoreddns.org
2a01:3a0:53:53::
Finland (FI)
Snopyta 95.216.24.230 fi.dot.dns.snopyta.org
2a01:4f9:2a:1919::9301
France (FR)
Neutopia 89.234.186.112 dns.neutopia.org
2a00:5884:8209::2
Luxembourg (LU)
Restena Foundation 158.64.1.29 kaitain.restena.lu
2001:a18:1::29
Netherlands (NL)
GetDNS 185.49.141.37 getdnsapi.net
2a04:b900:0:100::37
Surfnet 145.100.185.17 dnsovertls2.sinodun.com
145.100.185.18 dnsovertls3.sinodun.com
2001:610:1:40ba:145:100:185:17
2001:610:1:40ba:145:100:185:18
United States (US)
Comcast / Xfinity (beta) 96.113.151.145 dot.xfinity.com

These providers are not recommended for use with IPFire because they do not support DNSSEC or tamper with DNS traffic in another way, such as filtering malware or porn.

Operator IP Addresses
Cleanbrowsing 2a0d:2a00:1::2 / 185.228.168.9, 2a0d:2a00:2::2 / 185.228.169.9
DNS for Family 94.130.180.225 / 2a01:4f8:1c0c:40db::1, 78.47.64.161 / 2a01:4f8:1c17:4df8::1, dns-dot.dnsforfamily.com, https://dns-doh.dnsforfamily.com/dns-query
Comodo Secure DNS 8.26.56.26, 8.20.247.20
DNSReactor 45.55.155.25, 104.236.210.29
FreeDNS 37.235.1.174, 37.235.1.177
GreenTeamDNS 81.218.119.1, 09.88.198.133
Nuernberg Internet Exchange (N-IX) 194.8.57.12
OpenDNS (Hosted Blacklists) 208.67.222.222, 208.67.220.220, 208.67.220.222, 208.67.222.220
Quad 9 9.9.9.9, 149.112.112.112, 9.9.9.10, 149.112.112.10
SWITCH (Hosted Blacklists) 130.59.31.248 / 2001:620:0:ff::2, 130.59.31.251 / 2001:620:0:ff::3
Yandex.DNS 77.88.8.88, 77.88.8.2
SafeDNS 195.46.39.39, 195.46.39.40
Level 3 / CentryLink / Verizon 4.2.2.1, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.2.2.4, 4.2.2.5, 4.2.2.6
SkyDNS 193.58.251.251
New Nations 5.45.96.220
SecureDNS 1 146.185.167.43

About location and DNSSEC status

The location of the servers has been stated by using the IPFire Location database. However, it might be possible that the location is wrong (or has been changed meanwhile).

The servers that are marked with “Anycast” are using anycasts so that traffic will be routed to the nearest of the many instances that are there on the network. Thereof the exact location of the server(s) cannot be determined. Worse, different configurations of Anycast instances cannot be determined reliable.

Security Considerations

A DNS server has a very powerful function in network topology. Please keep in mind that it might log your queries (which is a huge information leak).

Further, not all of the DNS servers listed above return correct answers in any case. Some of them return failures for harmful or malicious sites. Check the operators website for more information on this topic.

For security reasons, it is required to use DNS servers which support DNSSEC. For privacy and availability reasons, avoid using just one providers’ DNS servers.

old list: Public DNS Servers

  • Cloudflare: 1.1.1.1 and 1.0.0.1
    2606:4700:4700::1111
    2606:4700:4700::1001
  • Alternate DNS
    198.101.242.72
    23.253.163.53
  • BlockAid Public DNS (or PeerDNS)
    205.204.88.60
    178.21.23.150
  • Censurfridns
    91.239.100.100
    89.233.43.71
    2001:67c:28a4::
    2002:d596:2a92:1:71:53::
  • Christoph Hochstätter
    209.59.210.167
    85.214.117.11
  • ClaraNet
    212.82.225.7
    212.82.226.212
  • Comodo Secure DNS
    8.26.56.26
    8.20.247.20
  • DNS.Watch
    84.200.69.80
    84.200.70.40
    2001:1608:10:25::1c04:b12f
    2001:1608:10:25::9249:d69b
  • DNSReactor
    104.236.210.29
    45.55.155.25
  • Dyn
    216.146.35.35
    216.146.36.36
  • FDN
    80.67.169.12
    2001:910:800::12
  • FoeBud
    85.214.73.63
  • FoolDNS
    87.118.111.215
    213.187.11.62
  • FreeDNS
    37.235.1.174
    37.235.1.177
  • Freenom World
    with massive amounts of tutorials for many routers: https://www.freenom.world/en/test-my-device.html
    80.80.80.80
    80.80.81.81
  • German Privacy Foundation e.V.
    87.118.100.175
    94.75.228.29
    85.25.251.254
    62.141.58.13
  • Google Public DNS
    8.8.8.8
    8.8.4.4
    2001:4860:4860::8888
    2001:4860:4860::8844
  • GreenTeamDNS
    81.218.119.11
    209.88.198.133
  • Hurricane Electric
    74.82.42.42
    2001:470:20::2
  • Level3
    209.244.0.3
    209.244.0.4
  • Neustar DNS Advantage
    156.154.70.1
    156.154.71.1
  • New Nations
    5.45.96.220
    185.82.22.133
  • Norton DNS
    198.153.192.1
    198.153.194.1
  • OpenDNS
    208.67.222.222
    208.67.220.220
    2620:0:ccc::2
    2620:0:ccd::2
  • OpenNIC
    58.6.115.42
    58.6.115.43
    119.31.230.42
    200.252.98.162
    217.79.186.148
    81.89.98.6
    78.159.101.37
    203.167.220.153
    82.229.244.191
    216.87.84.211
    66.244.95.20
    207.192.69.155
    72.14.189.120
    2001:470:8388:2:20e:2eff:fe63:d4a9
    2001:470:1f07:38b::1
    2001:470:1f10:c6::2001
  • PowerNS
    194.145.226.26
    77.220.232.44
  • Quad9
    9.9.9.9
    2620:fe::fe
  • SafeDNS
    195.46.39.39
    195.46.39.40
  • SkyDNS
    193.58.251.251
  • SmartViper Public DNS
    208.76.50.50
    208.76.51.51
  • ValiDOM
    78.46.89.147
    88.198.75.145
  • Verisign
    64.6.64.6
    64.6.65.6
    2620:74:1b::1:1
    2620:74:1c::2:2
  • Xiala.net
    77.109.148.136
    77.109.148.137
    2001:1620:2078:136::
    2001:1620:2078:137::
  • Yandex.DNS
    77.88.8.88
    77.88.8.2
    2a02:6b8::feed:bad
    2a02:6b8:0:1::feed:bad
  • puntCAT
    109.69.8.51
    2a00:1508:0:4::9

    • dot.sb has address 185.222.222.222
      dns.sb has address 185.222.222.222 and 185.184.222.222

    operated by: xTom (xtom.com)

    https://de-dus.doh.sb/dns-query
    host de-dus.doh.sb
    de-dus.doh.sb has address 62.133.35.15
    de-dus.doh.sb has IPv6 address 2a09:0:8::15

    https://de-fra.doh.sb/dns-query
    host de-fra.doh.sb
    de-fra.doh.sb has address 147.78.178.171
    de-fra.doh.sb has address 147.78.178.172
    de-fra.doh.sb has address 147.78.178.170
    de-fra.doh.sb has address 147.78.178.174
    de-fra.doh.sb has address 147.78.178.173
    de-fra.doh.sb has IPv6 address 2a09:0:1:a::a

    https://nl-ams.doh.sb/dns-query
    host nl-ams.doh.sb
    nl-ams.doh.sb has address 78.142.193.52
    nl-ams.doh.sb has address 78.142.193.50
    nl-ams.doh.sb has address 78.142.193.54
    nl-ams.doh.sb has address 78.142.193.51
    nl-ams.doh.sb has address 78.142.193.53
    nl-ams.doh.sb has IPv6 address 2a0c:59c0:19::3

    https://nl-ams2.doh.sb/dns-query
    host nl-ams2.doh.sb
    nl-ams2.doh.sb has address 194.169.181.36
    nl-ams2.doh.sb has address 194.169.181.38
    nl-ams2.doh.sb has address 194.169.181.34
    nl-ams2.doh.sb has address 194.169.181.35
    nl-ams2.doh.sb has address 194.169.181.37
    nl-ams2.doh.sb has IPv6 address 2a09:0:7:4::2

    https://ee-tll.doh.sb/dns-query
    host ee-tll.doh.sb
    ee-tll.doh.sb has address 185.37.252.149
    ee-tll.doh.sb has address 185.37.252.150
    ee-tll.doh.sb has address 185.37.252.148
    ee-tll.doh.sb has address 185.37.252.147
    ee-tll.doh.sb has address 185.37.252.146
    ee-tll.doh.sb has IPv6 address 2a04:6f00:3::2

    https://jp-kix.doh.sb/dns-query
    host jp-kix.doh.sb
    jp-kix.doh.sb has address 202.5.221.134
    jp-kix.doh.sb has address 202.5.221.132
    jp-kix.doh.sb has address 202.5.221.133
    jp-kix.doh.sb has address 202.5.221.130
    jp-kix.doh.sb has address 202.5.221.131
    jp-kix.doh.sb has IPv6 address 2403:ac80:1030::2

    https://us-chi.doh.sb/dns-query
    host us-chi.doh.sb
    us-chi.doh.sb has address 104.128.62.173

    https://in-blr.doh.sb/dns-query
    host in-blr.doh.sb
    in-blr.doh.sb has address 143.244.128.32
    in-blr.doh.sb has IPv6 address 2400:6180:100:d0::798:d001

    https://sg-sin.doh.sb/dns-query
    host sg-sin.doh.sb
    sg-sin.doh.sb has address 139.162.25.51
    sg-sin.doh.sb has IPv6 address 2400:8901::f03c:92ff:fe4d:9e04

    https://hk-hkg.doh.sb/dns-query
    host hk-hkg.doh.sb
    hk-hkg.doh.sb has address 45.125.0.26
    hk-hkg.doh.sb has IPv6 address 2403:2c80::26

is the internet connection working?

ping 1.1.1.1
# should return (if inet connection and routing is working)
PING 1.1.1.1 (1.1.1.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from 1.1.1.1: icmp_seq=1 ttl=59 time=28.3 ms
64 bytes from 1.1.1.1: icmp_seq=3 ttl=59 time=29.7 ms
64 bytes from 1.1.1.1: icmp_seq=4 ttl=59 time=27.8 ms
64 bytes from 1.1.1.1: icmp_seq=5 ttl=59 time=34.1 ms
^C
--- 1.1.1.1 ping statistics ---
5 packets transmitted, 4 received, 20% packet loss, time 38ms
rtt min/avg/max/mdev = 27.799/29.995/34.145/2.497 ms

# alternatively ping yahoo.com
ping 98.137.246.7

should work

is DNS working?

ping yahoo.com
# should return
PING yahoo.com (74.6.231.20) 56(84) bytes of data.
64 bytes from media-router-fp73.prod.media.vip.ne1.yahoo.com (74.6.231.20): icmp_seq=1 ttl=45 time=144 ms
# if inet connection is is working

# or test if DNS is working:
# should return the IP address of yahoo.com if DNS is working
host yahoo.com
# should return something like (if DNS is working)
yahoo.com has address 98.137.11.164
yahoo.com has address 74.6.143.25
yahoo.com has address 74.6.143.26
yahoo.com has address 74.6.231.20
yahoo.com has address 74.6.231.21
yahoo.com has address 98.137.11.163
yahoo.com has IPv6 address 2001:4998:44:3507::8001
yahoo.com has IPv6 address 2001:4998:24:120d::1:1
yahoo.com has IPv6 address 2001:4998:124:1507::f001
yahoo.com has IPv6 address 2001:4998:24:120d::1:0
yahoo.com has IPv6 address 2001:4998:44:3507::8000
yahoo.com has IPv6 address 2001:4998:124:1507::f000
yahoo.com mail is handled by 1 mta5.am0.yahoodns.net.
yahoo.com mail is handled by 1 mta7.am0.yahoodns.net.
yahoo.com mail is handled by 1 mta6.am0.yahoodns.net.

should work.

probably the most important GNU Linux DNS (client)config file

hostnamectl; # tested with
  Operating System: Debian GNU/Linux 10 (buster)
            Kernel: Linux 4.19.0-16-amd64
      Architecture: x86-64

cat /etc/resolv.conf 
# Generated by NetworkManager
nameserver 123.123.123.123
nameserver 192.168.0.1

here are the DNS servers listed that are used by the system.

it seems that GNU Linux Debian 10 (+Gnome2 MATE Desktop -> Network Manager)

changed taken here do not take effect until system reboot

apt show network-manager

Package: network-manager
Version: 1.14.6-2+deb10u1
Priority: optional
Section: net
Maintainer: Utopia Maintenance Team

Description: network management framework (daemon and userspace tools)
NetworkManager is a system network service that manages your network devices
and connections, attempting to keep active network connectivity when
available. It manages ethernet, WiFi, mobile broadband (WWAN), and PPPoE
devices, and provides VPN integration with a variety of different VPN
services.

This package provides the userspace daemons and a command line interface to
interact with NetworkManager.

Optional dependencies:
* ppp: Required for establishing dial-up connections (e.g. via GSM).
* dnsmasq-base/iptables: Required for creating Ad-hoc connections and
connection sharing.
address configuration.
* libteam-utils: Network Team driver allows multiple network interfaces to be
teamed together and act like a single one. This process is called “ethernet
bonding”, “channel teaming” or “link aggregation”.

what tools are there to debug connection problems?

traceroute

man: traceroute.man.txt

traceroute tracks the route packets taken from an IP network on their way to a given host. It utilizes the IP protocol’s time to live (TTL) field and attempts to elicit an ICMP TIME_EXCEEDED response from each gateway along the path to the host.

traceroute duckduckgo.com
traceroute to duckduckgo.com (40.114.177.156), 30 hops max, 60 byte packets
 1  192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1)  4.908 ms  5.862 ms  6.531 ms
 2  136.22.97.33 (136.22.97.33)  41.515 ms  41.490 ms  41.433 ms
 3  136.22.254.44 (136.22.254.44)  41.394 ms 142.250.160.202 (142.250.160.202)  41.429 ms 136.22.254.44 (136.22.254.44)  41.255 ms
 4  108.170.252.19 (108.170.252.19)  49.669 ms 108.170.252.18 (108.170.252.18)  49.623 ms 108.170.251.144 (108.170.251.144)  49.630 ms
 5  * 142.250.234.45 (142.250.234.45)  49.591 ms *
 6  * * *
 7  209.85.251.72 (209.85.251.72)  39.394 ms ae65-0.fra-96cbe-1b.ntwk.msn.net (198.200.130.254)  49.240 ms  49.175 ms
 8  ae22-0.icr02.fra21.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.232.129)  49.141 ms  49.100 ms ae65-0.fra-96cbe-1a.ntwk.msn.net (198.200.130.132)  49.051 ms
 9  ae26-0.icr01.fra21.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.232.127)  49.085 ms be-102-0.ibr01.fra21.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.23.105)  64.543 ms ae26-0.icr01.fra21.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.232.127)  54.937 ms
10  be-14-0.ibr01.ams30.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.28.103)  64.476 ms  64.464 ms be-100-0.ibr01.fra21.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.23.103)  43.527 ms
11  be-8-0.ibr02.ams30.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.28.123)  50.886 ms be-1-0.ibr02.ams21.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.16.146)  54.597 ms be-8-0.ibr02.ams30.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.28.123)  113.315 ms
12  be-22-0.ibr01.bom30.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.23.245)  54.436 ms be-1-0.ibr01.ams21.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.16.148)  54.562 ms ae100-0.icr01.ams30.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.22.214)  54.529 ms
13  * be-21-0.ibr02.bom30.ntwk.msn.net (104.44.23.247)  59.677 ms *
14  * * *
15  * * *
16  * * *
17  * * *
18  * * *
19  * * *
20  * * *
21  * * *
22  * * *
23  * * *
24  * * *
25  * * *
26  * * *
27  * * *
28  * * *
29  * * *
30  * * *

mtr (my traceroute)

has a nice gui and is good for tracing package “Loss”

su - root;
apt install mtr;
mtr -g duckduckgo.com

man: mtr.man.txt

bench dns servers:

WARNING! https://code.google.com/archive/p/namebench/

was developed by someone working at-for Google.

would leave the “Upload and share your anonymized results” box unchecked.

it will run for a very long time… (does checking of 4500 name servers 250x)

su - root
apt install namebench
Ctrl+D # logout root
namebench # start it (it's a gui program)

manpage: namebench.man.txt

what does the user get for all this hazzle?

after a pretty long wait…

namebench_2021-06-07_2002.html

is produced that includes nice graphs such as:

this result was generated while half-time switching from StarLink to Vodafone LTE X-D

this result was generated while half-time switching from StarLink to Vodafone LTE X-D

what tools are there to query dns?

host is a simple utility for performing DNS lookups.

It is normally used to convert names to IP addresses and vice versa.

When no arguments or options are given, host prints a short summary of its command line arguments and options.

host google.com
google.com has address 216.58.207.46
google.com has IPv6 address 2a00:1450:4001:824::200e
google.com mail is handled by 10 aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com mail is handled by 50 alt4.aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com mail is handled by 40 alt3.aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com mail is handled by 20 alt1.aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com mail is handled by 30 alt2.aspmx.l.google.com.

# use specific DNS server/specify DNS server to use for this DNS query
dig @62.133.35.15 dwaves.de -t A

; <<>> DiG 9.11.5-P4-5.1+deb10u3-Debian <<>> @62.133.35.15 dwaves.de -t A
; (1 server found)
;; global options: +cmd
;; Got answer:
;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 8111
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 1

;; OPT PSEUDOSECTION:
; EDNS: version: 0, flags:; udp: 1232
;; QUESTION SECTION:
;dwaves.de.			IN	A

;; ANSWER SECTION:
dwaves.de.		3600	IN	A	78.46.181.43

;; Query time: 80 msec
;; SERVER: 62.133.35.15#53(62.133.35.15)
;; WHEN: Mon Jun 07 14:57:30 CEST 2021
;; MSG SIZE  rcvd: 54


host -v google.com
Trying "google.com"
;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 14663
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0

;; QUESTION SECTION:
;google.com. IN A

;; ANSWER SECTION:
google.com. 71 IN A 142.250.185.206

Received 44 bytes from 195.10.195.195#53 in 33 ms
Trying "google.com"
;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 10797
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0

;; QUESTION SECTION:
;google.com. IN AAAA

;; ANSWER SECTION:
google.com. 174 IN AAAA 2a00:1450:4001:812::200e

Received 56 bytes from 195.10.195.195#53 in 32 ms
Trying "google.com"
;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 40525
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 5, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0

;; QUESTION SECTION:
;google.com. IN MX

;; ANSWER SECTION:
google.com. 381 IN MX 30 alt2.aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com. 381 IN MX 10 aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com. 381 IN MX 50 alt4.aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com. 381 IN MX 20 alt1.aspmx.l.google.com.
google.com. 381 IN MX 40 alt3.aspmx.l.google.com.

# the dns server used port 53 (DNS)
Received 146 bytes from 195.10.195.195#53 in 33 ms
manpage: of command host.man.txt

# why this tool is not installed per default on RedHat/Fedora/CentOS/rpm based distributions, i don't know
# if "host" command is missing install:
yum install bind-utils

rpm -qi bind-utils-9.9.4-72.el7.x86_64
Name        : bind-utils
Epoch       : 32
Version     : 9.9.4
Release     : 72.el7
Architecture: x86_64
Install Date: Tue 29 Jan 2019 03:43:36 PM CET
Group       : Applications/System
Size        : 441404
License     : ISC
Signature   : RSA/SHA256, Mon 12 Nov 2018 03:22:04 PM CET, Key ID 24c6a8a7f4a80eb5
Source RPM  : bind-9.9.4-72.el7.src.rpm
Build Date  : Wed 31 Oct 2018 01:29:37 AM CET
Build Host  : x86-01.bsys.centos.org
Relocations : (not relocatable)
Packager    : CentOS BuildSystem <http://bugs.centos.org>
Vendor      : CentOS
URL         : http://www.isc.org/products/BIND/
Summary     : Utilities for querying DNS name servers
Description :
Bind-utils contains a collection of utilities for querying DNS (Domain
Name System) name servers to find out information about Internet
hosts. These tools will provide you with the IP addresses for given
host names, as well as other information about registered domains and
network addresses.

You should install bind-utils if you need to get information from DNS name
servers.

# what is in the package?
rpm -ql bind-utils-9.9.4-72.el7.x86_64
/etc/trusted-key.key
/usr/bin/dig
/usr/bin/host
/usr/bin/nslookup
/usr/bin/nsupdate
/usr/share/man/man1/dig.1.gz
/usr/share/man/man1/host.1.gz
/usr/share/man/man1/nslookup.1.gz
/usr/share/man/man1/nsupdate.1.gz

rpm -ql bind-libs-9.9.4-72.el7.x86_64
/usr/lib64/libbind9.so.90
/usr/lib64/libbind9.so.90.0.8
/usr/lib64/libdns.so.100
/usr/lib64/libdns.so.100.1.1
/usr/lib64/libisc.so.95
/usr/lib64/libisc.so.95.2.1
/usr/lib64/libisccc.so.90
/usr/lib64/libisccc.so.90.0.4
/usr/lib64/libisccfg.so.90
/usr/lib64/libisccfg.so.90.0.7
/usr/lib64/liblwres.so.90
/usr/lib64/liblwres.so.90.0.5

 

OpenDNS – Website Filter

Es ist möglich via DNS den Zugang zu bestimmten Seiten zu sperren z.B. wenn Sie nicht möchten, dass in ihrer Firma auf Facebook.com zugegriffen werden kann, dann sollten Sie sich einen Account bei: https://use.opendns.com/ holen (prinzipiell kostenlos) und dort die Filter-Funktion aktivieren und zentral in ihren DSL-Router oder sonstigen dedizierten DNS-Server (ist meistens auch der DHCP-Server) diese zwei Namen-Server eintragen: 208.67.222.222, 208.67.220.220.

Kann auch dezentral – pro PC – pro Host – in den Netzwerkeinstellungen der Netzwerkkarte (IPv4/IPv6) gemacht werden.

Dann erhält der User eine Fehlermeldung “Diese Seite ist gesperrt” statt facebook.com.

Allerdings: Wenn der User seinen eigenen DNS-Server eintragen kann (Administrator-Rechte hat) kann er diese Sperre umgehen.

Die Filter-Funktion versucht auch gehackte Server zu sperren – von denen eventuell in Webseiten versteckte Viren/Trojaner/Schadsoftware versucht (JavaScript am besten standardmäßig deaktivieren -> NoScript Addon für Firefox!!!) Schad-Code nachzuladen.

Dies hätte vermutlich die Installation des “Fake-Flashplayer-Updates” auch ohne Virenscanner verhindert.

Man MUSS die User vor sich selbst schützen.

Wer?

Verschiedene regionale Organisationen – https://www.nic.at/ = Österreich.

About BIND

BIND stands for “Berkeley Internet Name Domain”, because the software originated in the early 1980s at the University of California at Berkeley.

BIND is by far the most widely used DNS software on the Internet, providing a robust and stable platform on top of which organizations can build distributed computing systems with the knowledge that those systems are fully compliant with published DNS standards.

BIND and DNS

BIND implements the DNS protocols. The DNS protocols are part of the core Internet standards. They specify the process by which one computer can find another computer on the basis of its name. The BIND software distribution contains all of the software necessary for asking and answering name service questions.

The BIND software distribution has three parts:

1. Domain Name Resolver

A resolver is a program that resolves questions about names by sending those questions to appropriate servers and responding appropriately to the servers’ replies. In the most common application, a web browser uses a local stub resolver library on the same computer to look up names in the DNS. That stub resolver is part of the operating system. (Many operating system distributions use the BIND resolver library.) The stub resolver usually will forward queries to a caching resolver, a server or group of servers on the network dedicated to DNS services. Those resolvers will send queries to one or multiple authoritative servers in order to find the IP address for that DNS name.

2. Domain Name Authority server

An authoritative DNS server answers requests from resolvers, using information about the domain names it is authoritative for. You can provide DNS services on the Internet by installing this software on a server and giving it information about your domain names.

3. Tools

We include a number of diagnostic and operational tools. Some of them, such as the popular DIG tool, are not specific to BIND and can be used with any DNS server.

on newer debian9 minimal isos – dig does not come pre installed – you will have to install it manually:

apt install dnsutils

Why Use BIND?

  • BIND is transparent open source. If your organization needs some functionality that is not in BIND, you can modify it, and contribute the new feature back to the the community by sending us your source. Download a tar ball from the ISC web site or ftp.isc.org, or a binary from your operating system repository.
  • BIND has evolved to be a very flexible, full-featured DNS system. Whatever your application is, BIND most likely has the features required.
  • As the first, oldest and most commonly deployed solution, there are more network engineers who are already familiar with BIND than any other system. Help is available via our community mailing-list, or you may subscribe for expert, confidential 7×24 support from the ISC team.

Getting Started

BIND is distributed as source code, with executables provided for Windows. You download the code from this website, unpack the archive, and build it for whatever system you plan to run it on. You will need a UNIX system with an ANSI C compiler, basic POSIX support, and a 64 bit integer type. BIND runs and is supported on a very wide variety of new and old operating systems, including most UNIX and LINUX variants, and some Windows platforms.

Most users run BIND on CentOS, Red Hat Enterprise Linux, Debian, Fedora, FreeBSD, Solaris, Ubuntu or Windows. The most up-to-date versions of BIND are always available from ISC on our web site and ftp server. Most operating systems also offer BIND packages for their users. These may be built with a different set of defaults than the standard BIND distribution and some of them add a version number of their own that does not map exactly to the BIND version.

For configuration assistance, and overall understanding of how to use BIND, the BIND Administrative Reference Manual (ARM) is the primary tool. Resolver users may find Getting started for Recursive Resolvers to be useful. Windows users may find the explanation of the versions available for Windows useful. There are a number of excellent books on BIND. Ron Hutchinson’s DNS for Rocket Scientists is generously posted on the Internet at Zytrax.com and can be a very helpful on-line reference tool.

src: https://www.isc.org/downloads/bind/

Kurioses:

root dns server

root_servers_etc_bind_db.root.debian.txt

Root Servers

The authoritative name servers that serve the DNS root zone, commonly known as the “root servers”, are a network of hundreds of servers in many countries around the world.

They are configured in the DNS root zone as 13 named authorities, as follows.

who is running this infrastructure?

List of Root Servers

Hostname IP Addresses Manager
a.root-servers.net 198.41.0.4, 2001:503:ba3e::2:30 VeriSign, Inc.
b.root-servers.net 192.228.79.201, 2001:500:200::b University of Southern California (ISI)
c.root-servers.net 192.33.4.12, 2001:500:2::c Cogent Communications
d.root-servers.net 199.7.91.13, 2001:500:2d::d University of Maryland
e.root-servers.net 192.203.230.10, 2001:500:a8::e NASA (Ames Research Center)
f.root-servers.net 192.5.5.241, 2001:500:2f::f Internet Systems Consortium, Inc.
g.root-servers.net 192.112.36.4, 2001:500:12::d0d US Department of Defense (NIC)
h.root-servers.net 198.97.190.53, 2001:500:1::53 US Army (Research Lab)
i.root-servers.net 192.36.148.17, 2001:7fe::53 Netnod
j.root-servers.net 192.58.128.30, 2001:503:c27::2:30 VeriSign, Inc.
k.root-servers.net 193.0.14.129, 2001:7fd::1 RIPE NCC
l.root-servers.net 199.7.83.42, 2001:500:9f::42 ICANN
m.root-servers.net 202.12.27.33, 2001:dc3::35 WIDE Project

src: https://www.iana.org/domains/root/servers

https://www.iana.org/domains/root/files

attacks and centralization

Ausfallsicherheit und Angriffe

Die Root-Server bearbeiten eine sehr große Anzahl von Anfragen, ein erheblicher Teil davon verursacht durch fehlerhafte Software oder Netzwerkkonfiguration.[3] Eine Filterung auf DNS-Ebene findet nicht statt, da dies aufgrund der Einfachheit einer DNS-Anfrage mehr Ressourcen aufwenden würde, als alle Anfragen zu beantworten.

Gemäß RFC 2870 muss jeder Root-Server mit dem dreifachen Peak des am stärksten belasteten Root-Servers umgehen können. Das bedeutet, dass ein Root-Server im Normalbetrieb nur maximal ein Drittel seiner Kapazität ausnutzen darf. Fallen zwei Drittel der Root-Server aus, soll das noch betriebsfähige Drittel die Anfragen beantworten können.

Der Angriff mit der größten Wirkung auf die Root-Server fand am 21. Oktober 2002 statt. Ein DDoS erfolgte 75 Minuten lang mit zusammen 900 MBit/s (1,8 Mpkts/s) auf alle 13 Root-Server. Alle Root-Server blieben zwar lauffähig, da die vorgeschalteten Firewalls den Angriffsverkehr verwarfen, allerdings waren etwa neun Root-Server durch die überfluteten Leitungen schlecht bis gar nicht erreichbar.

Root-Server-Lookups wurden dadurch deutlich verzögert, durch das Caching gab es jedoch kaum Störungen bei den Anwendern. Ausgelöst durch den DDoS-Angriff wurde die Umsetzung von Anycast beschleunigt.

Ein weiterer Angriff fand am 15. Februar 2006 statt, einige Tage, nachdem die Nameserver einer von der ICANN nicht genannten Top-Level-Domain angegriffen worden waren.[4]

Dieser DDoS-Angriff wurde als DNS Amplification Attack durchgeführt, wodurch sich das aufgekommene Datenvolumen vervielfachte. Zwei der lediglich drei angegriffenen Root-Server waren 15 Minuten lang nicht erreichbar.

Am 6. Februar 2007 fand ein weiterer DDoS-Angriff auf die Root-Server und gleichzeitig auf einige TLD-Nameserver statt. Zwei Root-Server waren nicht erreichbar.[5]

Kritik

Kritiker erachten das Mitspracherecht der US-Regierung als problematisch.[6] Dies betrifft zum einen den rechtlichen Status der ICANN, die als kalifornische Institution den US-Gesetzen untersteht. Zum anderen ist die ICANN seit ihrer Gründung mittels eines Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) an das US-Handelsministerium gebunden. Das MoU wurde zuletzt 2006 für drei Jahre verlängert.[7]

Auch VeriSign, die verteilende Instanz der Root-Zonenänderungen, unterliegt als kalifornisches Unternehmen der US-Gesetzgebung.

Um die Einflussnahme der USA auf das Domain Name System zu verringern, entstand unter Mitwirkung von Internetpionieren wie Paul Vixie 2002 das Open Root Server Network (ORSN) als alternativer Root. Der Betrieb des ORSN wurde zum 31. Dezember 2008 eingestellt,[8] 2013 als Reaktion auf PRISM und Tempora jedoch wieder aufgenommen.[9]

src: https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Root-Nameserver#Ausfallsicherheit_und_Angriffe

systemd != named

but it does dns resolution for applications? WTF?

“systemd-resolved is a system service that provides network name resolution to local applications.

It implements a caching and validating DNS/DNSSEC stub resolver, as well as an LLMNR resolver and responder.”

src: systemd-resolved.man.txt

DNS Software

bind9 is the defacto standard in “the internet” and on linux. (Debian/Ubuntu/Centos/Redhat/Suse all use bind9)

installing bind9 in Debian/Ubuntu


dpkg -l|grep dns; # what is already installed?
ii  dnsutils                             1:9.9.5.dfsg-9+deb8u10              i386         Clients provided with BIND
ii  libapache2-mod-dnssd                 0.6-3.1                             i386         Zeroconf support for Apache 2 via avahi
ii  libdns-export100                     1:9.9.5.dfsg-9+deb8u10              i386         Exported DNS Shared Library
ii  libdns100                            1:9.9.5.dfsg-9+deb8u10              i386         DNS Shared Library used by BIND
ii  libnss-mdns:i386                     0.10-6                              i386         NSS module for Multicast DNS name resolution
ii  python-dnspython                     1.12.0-1                            all          DNS toolkit for Python

apt-get install bind9; # install bind9
apt-get install bind9utils; # probably also usefull
apt-get install dnsutils; # probably also usefull

# what else is there concerning bind
apt-cache search bind9; # search repo
bind9 - Internet Domain Name Server                  <- what one is looking for
bind9-doc - Documentation for BIND                   <- can not hurt
bind9-host - Version of 'host' bundled with BIND 9.X
bind9utils - Utilities for BIND                      <- sounds good, but i don't know exactly what comes with it
libbind9-90 - BIND9 Shared Library used by BIND
bindgraph - DNS statistics RRDtool frontend for BIND9
collectd-core - statistics collection and monitoring daemon (core system)
designate - OpenStack DNS as a Service - metapackage
designate-agent - OpenStack DNS as a Service - agent
designate-api - OpenStack DNS as a Service - API server
designate-central - OpenStack DNS as a Service - central daemon
designate-common - OpenStack DNS as a Service - common files
designate-doc - OpenStack DNS as a Service - doc
designate-sink - OpenStack DNS as a Service - sink
python-designate - OpenStack DNS as a Service - Python libs
dlz-ldap-enum - Plug-in for bind9 that uses LDAP data to fulfill ENUM requests
dms - bind9 DNS Management System, master server meta-package
dms-core - bind9 DNS Management System, core system
dms-dr - bind9 DNS Management System, DR scripts and setup.
dms-wsgi - bind9 DNS Management System, WSGI JSON http RPC backend.
gforge-dns-bind9 - collaborative development tool - DNS management (using Bind9)
gadmin-bind - GTK+ configuration tool for bind9

https://packages.debian.org/jessie/bind9utils

installing bind9 in CentOS/REDHAT

rpm -qa --last|grep dns; # what is already installed?
dnsmasq-2.66-21.el7.x86_64                    Di 02 Mai 2017 15:58:17 CEST

yum install bind; # install bind9
yum install bind-utils; # probably also usefull

installing bind9 in SUSE21

either you are a registered (paid) user of SUSE Enterprise Server 12 – or you won’t get any online-updates.
If you want to install software – it is hopefully on the SUSE12-DVD or you will have to checkout and add alternative repositories https://en.opensuse.org/Additional_package_repositories

rpm -qa --last|grep dns; # what is already installed?

yast2-dns-server-3.1.24-7.6.noarch            Mo 24 Apr 2017 12:58:03 CEST
libadns1-1.4-101.65.x86_64                    Mo 24 Apr 2017 12:27:04 CES

zypper install bind bind-utils; # install bind9 and utilities
Repository-Daten werden geladen...
Installierte Pakete werden gelesen...
Paketabhängigkeiten werden aufgelöst...
Die folgenden 3 NEUEN Pakete werden installiert:
  bind bind-chrootenv libmysqlclient18
3 neue Pakete zu installieren.
Gesamtgröße des Downloads: 907,5 KiB. Bereits im Cache gespeichert: 0 B. Nach der Operation werden zusätzlich 4,0 MiB belegt.
Fortfahren? [j/n/? zeigt alle Optionen] (j): j
Paket bind-chrootenv-9.9.9P1-46.1.x86_64 abrufen                                                                              (1/3),  43,0 KiB (  1,6 KiB entpackt)
Paket libmysqlclient18-10.0.27-12.1.x86_64 abrufen                                                                            (2/3), 560,0 KiB (  3,3 MiB entpackt)
Paket bind-9.9.9P1-46.1.x86_64 abrufen                                                                                        (3/3), 304,5 KiB (739,9 KiB entpackt)
Überprüfung auf Dateikonflikte läuft: .....................................................................................................................[fertig]
(1/3) Installieren: bind-chrootenv-9.9.9P1-46.1.x86_64 ....................................................................................................[fertig]
Zusätzliche rpm-Ausgabe:
Updating /etc/sysconfig/named...
Updating /etc/sysconfig/syslog...
(2/3) Installieren: libmysqlclient18-10.0.27-12.1.x86_64 ..................................................................................................[fertig]
(3/3) Installieren: bind-9.9.9P1-46.1.x86_64 ..............................................................................................................[fertig]
Zusätzliche rpm-Ausgabe:
Updating /etc/sysconfig/named...
wrote key file "/etc/rndc.key"

DNS commands and examples

there are 3 vms in the LAN with hostnames: suse, centos and debian.

suse:~ # host debian; # checkout what ip address is translated into what host or domain name
debian.domainname.local has address 172.20.0.14
suse:~ # host centos
centos.domainname.local has address 172.20.0.28
suse:~ # host suse
suse.domainname.local has address 172.20.0.25

### enable / disable bind9-named service
## enable
# debian
update-rc.d bind9 enable
service bind9 start

# suse / centos / redhat
systemctl enable named
service named start

## disable
# debian
service bind9 stop
update-rc.d bind9 disable

# suse / centos / redhat
service named stop
systemctl disable named

### how to restart service?
## suse / centos / redhat
systemctl restart named.service; # restart

## debian
service bind9 restart

# try to get the full zonefile of a domain
# this might fail -> because should not be allowed because of DDoS protection
dig @dns.dwaves.de dwaves.de -t AXFR

; <<>> DiG 9.9.5-9+deb8u10-Debian <<>> @dns.dwaves.de dwaves.de -t AXFR
; (2 servers found)
;; global options: +cmd
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      SOA     ns1.localhost.ltd. root.dwaves.de. 2017040902 7200 3600 1209600 180
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      MX      10 mail.dwaves.de.
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      TXT     "v=spf1 a mx ip4:172.31.1.100 ?all"
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      NS      ns1.localhost.ltd.
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      NS      ns2.localhost.ltd.
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      A       172.31.1.100
_domainkey.dwaves.de.   14400   IN      TXT     "t=y\; o=~\;"
mail._domainkey.dwaves.de. 14400 IN     TXT     "k=rsa\; p=ajskdlfjklajsdkfljaklsdjfklajsdkfljaksldjfklajskldfjkaljsdkfljaksldjfklasjdkfl"
ftp.dwaves.de.          14400   IN      A       172.31.1.100
mail.dwaves.de.         14400   IN      A       172.31.1.100
pop.dwaves.de.          14400   IN      A       172.31.1.100
www.dwaves.de.          14400   IN      A       172.31.1.100
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      SOA     ns1.localhost.ltd. root.dwaves.de. 2017040902 7200 3600 1209600 180
;; Query time: 22 msec
;; SERVER: 78.46.249.71#53(78.46.249.71)
;; WHEN: Tue May 09 10:35:12 CEST 2017
;; XFR size: 13 records (messages 1, bytes 588)

# How to find SOA (Source Of Authority, domain server) of a domain? master-dns-server of a web server?
dig SOA +multiline dwaves.de

; <<>> DiG 9.9.5-9+deb8u10-Debian <<>> SOA +multiline dwaves.de
;; global options: +cmd
;; Got answer:
;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 4830
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 3

;; OPT PSEUDOSECTION:
; EDNS: version: 0, flags:; udp: 4000
;; QUESTION SECTION:
;dwaves.de.             IN SOA

;; ANSWER SECTION:
dwaves.de.              86395 IN SOA ns1.domainoffensive.de. hostmaster.domain-offensive.de. (
                                2017042211 ; serial
                                10800      ; refresh (3 hours)
                                3600       ; retry (1 hour)
                                604800     ; expire (1 week)
                                86400      ; minimum (1 day)
                                )

;; ADDITIONAL SECTION:
ns1.domainoffensive.de. 3540 IN A 95.130.22.130
ns1.domainoffensive.de. 3180 IN AAAA 2a02:2940:0:c004::130

;; Query time: 4 msec
;; SERVER: 172.20.0.2#53(172.20.0.2)
;; WHEN: Tue May 09 10:01:00 CEST 2017
;; MSG SIZE  rcvd: 166

### step by step name resolution

dig +add +trace @8.8.8.8 www.dwaves.de

; <<>> DiG 9.9.4-RedHat-9.9.4-38.el7_3.3 <<>> +add +trace @8.8.8.8 www.dwaves.de
; (1 server found)
;; global options: +cmd
.                       219029  IN      NS      e.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      h.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      l.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      i.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      a.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      d.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      c.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      b.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      j.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      k.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      g.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      m.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      NS      f.root-servers.net.
.                       219029  IN      RRSIG   NS 8 0 518400 20170521170000 20170508160000 14796 . jcbz3cVO6N5XAjpK2QSLcsiNAuRx7/Zcj35o0zMdT7baoT69ICm9hn18 nkmvoCUclz/k1Jin3QgD5CqgBmj8m3rVXlWFtD0YzDbKm+FhrqFRqv5h CdK+2sefHgMr+nnQl8h8nENNUiExK/YOdxeYvJ89aWzUEG4bvcoOWlJ0 rMMnAg3pQTcxNV8eCjMvTo2NZuGgulV0KJBDEZwh6q7WE7ArtPdbUXMb jKgU802MU98joviAJzdidRLCuQc8StzxjELtgyAlMHdAJu5h+ceEiY9L twkT3Cv+bgBufw0Yjnwf4zdObzVNsbl7GhpaPVGLDhAeOPoJX5qJX4e2 HfElVw==
;; Received 525 bytes from 8.8.8.8#53(8.8.8.8) in 379 ms

de.                     172800  IN      NS      f.nic.de.
de.                     172800  IN      NS      l.de.net.
de.                     172800  IN      NS      s.de.net.
de.                     172800  IN      NS      z.nic.de.
de.                     172800  IN      NS      a.nic.de.
de.                     172800  IN      NS      n.de.net.
de.                     86400   IN      DS      39227 8 2 AAB73083B9EF70E4A5E94769A418AC12E887FC3C0875EF206C3451DC 40B6C4FA
de.                     86400   IN      RRSIG   DS 8 1 86400 20170522050000 20170509040000 14796 . VDjCrWKH0VTdUd2u2tZyZljyiBg9nfkcNPbKDbrAtPmGlMhS5JGOcJvM Zst/L762tu1J5Bu0afqMEffcA0u2N1oboDsiwAI30ITmDE49qJ8b5RKy D85YNvtiRCllrxNPz5KKboEWksOj15/k+ZpeUUaiKT1fStKSq6+qt3hP XYjxnCA5SBTXjkN/Y8RdlrGSmNDx7c+PM3ZaHptp9aXmr85zwl7NHfjl Nq5gNA68XAw1YhjdUzRsL1oIHtkZMfudZ75zzhnbIaozHTezvfNdWCQ7 X2xAMrNMbbeKgAMAo9KkajTCW5Q4y6OhR0sQgx+owiTlPlKDP/YYm84s 7Oib8A==
;; Received 691 bytes from 192.33.4.12#53(c.root-servers.net) in 199 ms

dwaves.de.              86400   IN      NS      ns1.domainoffensive.de.
dwaves.de.              86400   IN      NS      ns2.domainoffensive.de.
dwaves.de.              86400   IN      NS      ns3.domainoffensive.de.
h319dm5gc3edek691vqbhehot7vggj2b.de. 7200 IN NSEC3 1 1 15 BA5EBA11 H31BJ3G4QCC5ICBKQH14CB2K8KTQICPL NS SOA RRSIG DNSKEY NSEC3PARAM
h319dm5gc3edek691vqbhehot7vggj2b.de. 7200 IN RRSIG NSEC3 8 2 7200 20170516090125 20170509090125 11884 de. cQdflumcmOHlFfcOKaTVBcfkTZnH/reKqm4T92C9DKHzhmtTCFcZVO7N Ja+QYSNd4suhuEALgkacUc4e1SeFIVMM7bF4WM+9nb3iCT1JUBdixhUC bHHSJ/FhXvQbkAht2FVpvObDQrr4crEX7pfdjEGlJTfe9vZZelUiJ9vT VgY=
js21fd6n8hdn1hbr6i57e843sagjtgue.de. 7200 IN NSEC3 1 1 15 BA5EBA11 JS26MHADL8MQ6Q5J4IP56DJ1T54DMDV1 A RRSIG
js21fd6n8hdn1hbr6i57e843sagjtgue.de. 7200 IN RRSIG NSEC3 8 2 7200 20170516090125 20170509090125 11884 de. t4mhKWoUHUM6wgk97I36ZPReVfZX7ji0MWJ0AnwTxtgYOP3vGjE0UnCT ccbV62HuwoXD2L8oMKeOh7HJQOlIVhcF5UCglfwaNk1W0+I3MLvZXqNG QwxGAFa2B1QEHGNk0E0KKdL5/o0qRp2X/LqvzHWj+BqJZa4XsueYrMZO m78=
;; Received 603 bytes from 194.246.96.1#53(z.nic.de) in 101 ms

www.dwaves.de.          86400   IN      A       78.46.249.71
;; Received 58 bytes from 95.130.22.138#53(ns3.domainoffensive.de) in 28 ms

named example output /var/log/messages: named.messages.txt

ZoneFile

in SUSE12 those are located under:


ll /var/lib/named
insgesamt 12
-rw-r--r-- 1 root  root   192 19. Nov 2009  127.0.0.zone <- this is a zone file
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root    26  8. Mai 16:42 dev
drwxr-xr-x 1 named named    0 23. Sep 2016  dyn
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root   110  8. Mai 16:15 etc
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root    14  8. Mai 14:33 lib
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root    14  8. Mai 14:33 lib64
-rw-r--r-- 1 root  root   182 19. Nov 2009  localhost.zone <- this is a zone file
drwxr-xr-x 1 named named    0 23. Sep 2016  log
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root     0 23. Sep 2016  master
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root     0  8. Mai 14:33 proc
-rw-r--r-- 1 root  root  3048 23. Sep 2016  root.hint
drwxr-xr-x 1 named named    0 23. Sep 2016  slave
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root    18  8. Mai 12:08 var

### let's create an example zone file
vim /var/lib/named/ich.de.zone;

in Debian8.7 those are located under:

root@debian:~# ll /etc/bind
total 52K
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 2.4K Feb 26 01:15 bind.keys
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root  237 Feb 26 01:15 db.0
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root  271 Feb 26 01:15 db.127
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root  237 Feb 26 01:15 db.255
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root  353 Feb 26 01:15 db.empty
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root  270 Feb 26 01:15 db.local
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 3.0K Feb 26 01:15 db.root
-rw-r--r-- 1 root bind  463 Feb 26 01:15 named.conf
-rw-r--r-- 1 root bind  490 Feb 26 01:15 named.conf.default-zones
-rw-r--r-- 1 root bind  165 Feb 26 01:15 named.conf.local
-rw-r--r-- 1 root bind  890 May  8 13:50 named.conf.options
-rw-r----- 1 bind bind   77 May  8 13:50 rndc.key
-rw-r--r-- 1 root root 1.3K Feb 26 01:15 zones.rfc1918
vim /etc/bind/db.domainname; # create new zone-domain-file

;; db.domainname
;; Forwardlookupzone für domainname
;;
$TTL 2D
@       IN      SOA     rechnername.domainname. mail.domainname. (
                        2006032201      ; Serial
                                8H      ; Refresh
                                2H      ; Retry
                                4W      ; Expire
                                3H )    ; NX (TTL Negativ Cache)

@                               IN      NS      rechnername.domainname.
                                IN      MX      10 mailserver.domainname.
                                IN      A       192.168.0.10

rechnername                     IN      A       192.168.0.10
localhost                       IN      A       127.0.0.1
rechner1                        IN      A       192.168.0.200
mailserver                      IN      A       192.168.0.201
rechner2                        IN      CNAME   mailserver

explained test-example zone file: (no guarantee if this works)

vim /var/lib/named/ich.de.zone; # create new zone file
### explanation:

$TTL 38400 <- Time to Live, 38400/60/60 = 10.66 hours, how often to refresh the dns cache, you might want to reduce this to minutes before moving a domain to a new ip
@ IN SOA <- IN = internet, SOA = Source Of Authority
dns.ich.de. <- domain-name with a dot at the end
hostmaster.ich.de. <- mail address of admin
 ( 
                        2010030201 <- YYYYMMDDXX <- is basically the "serial-number" - how recent is the zone-file of this server? (higher = more up to date)
                        3H ; Refresh-Intervall <- every 3 hours slave-server asks master-dns-server (SOA) if there are changes (serial-number has increased?)
                        1H ; Retry-Intervall <- if slave-server can't reach master - slave retries to reach master every 1h
                        1W ; Expire-Intervall <- if slave can't reach master for 1 WEEK slave-server declares this zone file invalid
                        3H) ; NX (TTL Negativ Cache) <- how long should a negative response ("Name Error" / "NXDOMAIN") be cached (from 0Sec to 3h). -> this space is intentional do not delete! <-
                        IN NS dns.ich.de. <- all INternet NameServers of this domain - who is the nameserver of this domain?
                        IN MX 50 mail1.ich.de. <- who is the mailserver of this domain? 50 = higher priority, primary mail server
                        IN MX 100 mail2.ich.de. <- who is the mailserver of this domain? 100 = lower priority, backup mail server
debian                  IN A 172.20.0.14
centos                  IN A 172.20.0.7
dns                     IN A 172.20.0.252
www                     IN CNAME debian

how to get zone-file of a domain/real life example of domain-offensive.de (do.de):

this might fail, because should not be allowed because of DDoS protection.

# try to get the full zonefile of a domain 
dig @dns.dwaves.de dwaves.de -t AXFR

; <<>> DiG 9.9.5-9+deb8u10-Debian <<>> @dns.dwaves.de dwaves.de -t AXFR
; (2 servers found)
;; global options: +cmd
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      SOA     ns1.localhost.ltd. root.dwaves.de. 2017040902 7200 3600 1209600 180
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      MX      10 mail.dwaves.de.
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      TXT     "v=spf1 a mx ip4:172.31.1.100 ?all"
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      NS      ns1.localhost.ltd.
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      NS      ns2.localhost.ltd.
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      A       172.31.1.100
_domainkey.dwaves.de.   14400   IN      TXT     "t=y\; o=~\;"
mail._domainkey.dwaves.de. 14400 IN     TXT     "k=rsa\; p=ajksldfjklajsdfkljaskdlfjaklsjdfklajsdkfljaklsdjfklajsdkfl"
ftp.dwaves.de.          14400   IN      A       172.31.1.100
mail.dwaves.de.         14400   IN      A       172.31.1.100
pop.dwaves.de.          14400   IN      A       172.31.1.100
www.dwaves.de.          14400   IN      A       172.31.1.100
dwaves.de.              14400   IN      SOA     ns1.localhost.ltd. root.dwaves.de. 2017040902 7200 3600 1209600 180
;; Query time: 22 msec
;; SERVER: 78.46.249.71#53(78.46.249.71)
;; WHEN: Tue May 09 10:35:12 CEST 2017
;; XFR size: 13 records (messages 1, bytes 588)

# if it fails you probably get something like 
dig @some-domain.com some-domain.com -t AXFR
;; Connection to 88.198.176.XXX#53(88.198.176.XXX) for some-domain.com failed: connection refused.

# or
dig @dns.yahoo.de yahoo.de -t AXFR

; <<>> DiG 9.9.5-9+deb8u10-Debian <<>> @dns.yahoo.de yahoo.de -t AXFR
; (1 server found)
;; global options: +cmd
;; connection timed out; no servers could be reached

whois 172.31.0.0

# ARIN WHOIS data and services are subject to the Terms of Use
# available at: https://www.arin.net/whois_tou.html
#
# If you see inaccuracies in the results, please report at
# https://www.arin.net/public/whoisinaccuracy/index.xhtml

# The following results may also be obtained via:
# https://whois.arin.net/rest/nets;q=172.31.0.0?showDetails=true&showARIN=false&showNonArinTopLevelNet=false&ext=netref2

NetRange:       172.16.0.0 - 172.31.255.255
CIDR:           172.16.0.0/12
NetName:        PRIVATE-ADDRESS-BBLK-RFC1918-IANA-RESERVED
NetHandle:      NET-172-16-0-0-1
Parent:         NET172 (NET-172-0-0-0-0)
NetType:        IANA Special Use
OriginAS:
Organization:   Internet Assigned Numbers Authority (IANA)
RegDate:        1994-03-15
Updated:        2013-08-30
Comment:        These addresses are in use by many millions of independently operated networks, which might be as small as a single computer connected to a home gateway, and are automatically configured in hundreds of millions of devices.  They are only intended for use within a private context  and traffic that needs to cross the Internet will need to use a different, unique address.
Comment:
Comment:        These addresses can be used by anyone without any need to coordinate with IANA or an Internet registry.  The traffic from these addresses does not come from ICANN or IANA.  We are not the source of activity you may see on logs or in e-mail records.  Please refer to http://www.iana.org/abuse/answers
Comment:
Comment:        These addresses were assigned by the IETF, the organization that develops Internet protocols, in the Best Current Practice document, RFC 1918 which can be found at:

another example file:

ich.de.zone – reverse lookup

Links: https://www.centos.org/docs/5/html/Deployment_Guide-en-US/s1-bind-zone.html

BIND log files

# suse
tail -f /var/log/messages

# debian
tail -f /var/log/syslog 
May  9 11:55:39 debian named[1893]: zone 0.20.172-in-addr.arpa/IN: refresh: retry limit for master 172.20.0.25#53 exceeded (source 0.0.0.0#0)
May  9 11:55:39 debian named[1893]: zone 0.20.172-in-addr.arpa/IN: Transfer started.
May  9 11:55:39 debian named[1893]: zone ich.de/IN: refresh: retry limit for master 172.20.0.25#53 exceeded (source 0.0.0.0#0)
May  9 11:55:39 debian named[1893]: zone ich.de/IN: Transfer started.
May  9 11:57:28 debian systemd[1]: Starting Session 6 of user user.
May  9 11:57:28 debian systemd[1]: Started Session 6 of user user.
May  9 11:57:46 debian named[1893]: transfer of '0.20.172-in-addr.arpa/IN' from 172.20.0.25#53: failed to connect: timed out
May  9 11:57:46 debian named[1893]: transfer of '0.20.172-in-addr.arpa/IN' from 172.20.0.25#53: Transfer completed: 0 messages, 0 records, 0 bytes, 127.198 secs (0 bytes/sec)
May  9 11:57:47 debian named[1893]: transfer of 'ich.de/IN' from 172.20.0.25#53: failed to connect: timed out
May  9 11:57:47 debian named[1893]: transfer of 'ich.de/IN' from 172.20.0.25#53: Transfer completed: 0 messages, 0 records, 0 bytes, 127.210 secs (0 bytes/sec)

BIND working directory

the binary-process-service of bind9 is called named – and it can have it’s own working directory.

If you have installed the bind-chroot package, the BIND service will run in the /var/named/chroot environment. All configuration files will be moved there. As such, you can find the zone files in /var/named/chroot/var/named. (src)

Under Debian/Ubuntu sind die wichtigsten bind-dateien im verzeichnis /etc/bind/ und Bind9#Bind_Chroot könnte man nachinstallieren.

suse:~ # cat /etc/named.conf |grep directory
        # The directory statement defines the name server's working directory
        directory "/var/lib/named";

suse:~ # ll /var/lib/named/
insgesamt 12
-rw-r--r-- 1 root  root   192 19. Nov 2009  127.0.0.zone
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root    20  8. Mai 12:08 dev
drwxr-xr-x 1 named named    0 23. Sep 2016  dyn
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root   110  8. Mai 14:33 etc
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root    14  8. Mai 14:33 lib
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root    14  8. Mai 14:33 lib64
-rw-r--r-- 1 root  root   182 19. Nov 2009  localhost.zone
drwxr-xr-x 1 named named    0 23. Sep 2016  log
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root     0 23. Sep 2016  master
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root     0  8. Mai 14:33 proc
-rw-r--r-- 1 root  root  3048 23. Sep 2016  root.hint
drwxr-xr-x 1 named named    0 23. Sep 2016  slave
drwxr-xr-x 1 root  root    18  8. Mai 12:08 var

[root@centos ~]# cat /etc/named.conf |grep directory
        directory       "/var/named";
        managed-keys-directory "/var/named/dynamic";

[root@centos ~]# ll /var/named
insgesamt 16K
drwxr-x---.  5 root  named  127  8. Mai 14:19 .
drwxr-xr-x. 20 root  root   280  8. Mai 14:19 ..
drwxrwx---.  2 named named    6 19. Apr 17:53 data
drwxrwx---.  2 named named    6 19. Apr 17:53 dynamic
-rw-r-----.  1 root  named 2,1K 28. Jan 2013  named.ca
-rw-r-----.  1 root  named  152 15. Dez 2009  named.empty
-rw-r-----.  1 root  named  152 21. Jun 2007  named.localhost
-rw-r-----.  1 root  named  168 15. Dez 2009  named.loopback
drwxrwx---.  2 named named    6 19. Apr 17:53 slaves

DNS config files – in general

the main bind-named-config file is called named.conf and located somewhere in the /etc directory 😀 (find / -iname named.conf) find it yourself 😀

# main config file of bind9: named.conf
###### Debian, different location and it is split over more config files than in SUSE/RedHat/CentOS
/etc/bind/named.conf;
vim /etc/bind/named.conf.default-zones; # zones

###### CentOS/RedHat
/etc/named.conf

###### SUSE, same location but different content than RedHat/CentOS
/etc/named.conf
vim /etc/named.conf; # let's checkout SUSE's config

DNS config file named.conf in detail – mainly focusing on SUSE12, but also Centos7/Debian8.7

Debian8.7 Manpage: named.conf.man.txt

vim /etc/named.conf; # let's checkout SUSE's config

# Copyright (c) 2001-2004 SuSE Linux AG, Nuernberg, Germany. <- aha
# All rights reserved.
#
# Author: Frank Bodammer, Lars Mueller <lmuelle@suse.de> <- ask this guy if it does not work
#
# /etc/named.conf
#
# This is a sample configuration file for the name server BIND 9.  It works as
# a caching only name server without modification.
#
# A sample configuration for setting up your own domain can be found in
# /usr/share/doc/packages/bind/sample-config.
#
# A description of all available options can be found in
# /usr/share/doc/packages/bind/misc/options.
options {
        # The directory statement defines the name server's working directory
        directory "/var/lib/named";
        # enable DNSSEC validation
        #
        # If BIND logs error messages about the root key being expired, you
        # will need to update your keys. See https://www.isc.org/bind-keys
        #
        # dnssec-enable yes (default), indicates that a secure DNS service
        # is being used which may be one, or more, of TSIG
        # (for securing zone transfers or DDNS updates), SIG(0)
        # (for securing DDNS updates) or DNSSEC.
        #dnssec-enable yes;
        # dnssec-validation yes (default), indicates that a resolver
        # (a caching or caching-only name server) will attempt to validate
        # replies from DNSSEC enabled (signed) zones. To perform this task
        # the server also needs either a valid trusted-keys clause
        # (containing one or more trusted-anchors or a managed-keys clause.
        #dnssec-validation auto;
        managed-keys-directory "/var/lib/named/dyn/";
        # Write dump and statistics file to the log subdirectory.  The
        # pathenames are relative to the chroot jail.
        dump-file "/var/log/named_dump.db";
        statistics-file "/var/log/named.stats";

        # The forwarders record contains a list of servers to which queries
        # should be forwarded.  Enable this line and modify the IP address to
        # your provider's name server.  Up to three servers may be listed.

        ### these are the nameservers, this nameserver will ask - if this nameserver does not have an answer to "Who has heise.de?"
        ### here you might want to put your ISP's DNS Server or even your local DNS-Router, i completely ignore ISP's DNS and put both OpenDNS Servers here
        forwarders { 208.67.222.222; 208.67.220.220; }; 

        # Enable the next entry to prefer usage of the name server declared in
        # the forwarders section.
        #forward first;
        # The listen-on record contains a list of local network interfaces to
        # listen on.  Optionally the port can be specified.  Default is to
        # listen on all interfaces found on your system.  The default port is
        # 53.

        ### you probably need to uncomment this to make your DNS server work, otherwise it won't answer any requests
        #listen-on port 53 { 127.0.0.1; };

        # The listen-on-v6 record enables or disables listening on IPv6
        # interfaces.  Allowed values are 'any' and 'none' or a list of
        # addresses.

        listen-on-v6 { any; };

        # The next three statements may be needed if a firewall stands between
        # the local server and the internet.

        #query-source address * port 53;
        #transfer-source * port 53;
        #notify-source * port 53;

        # The allow-query record contains a list of networks or IP addresses
        # to accept and deny queries from. The default is to allow queries
        # from all hosts.

        #allow-query { 127.0.0.1; };

        # If notify is set to yes (default), notify messages are sent to other
        # name servers when the the zone data is changed.  Instead of setting
        # a global 'notify' statement in the 'options' section, a separate
        # 'notify' can be added to each zone definition.

        ### if you have DNS-slave servers, you might want to put this to yes

        notify no;
    disable-empty-zone "1.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.IP6.ARPA";
};
# To configure named's logging remove the leading '#' characters of the
# following examples.
#logging {
#       # Log queries to a file limited to a size of 100 MB.
#       channel query_logging {
#               file "/var/log/named_querylog"
#                       versions 3 size 100M;
#               print-time yes;                 // timestamp log entries
#       };
#       category queries {
#               query_logging;
#       };
#
#       # Or log this kind alternatively to syslog.
#       channel syslog_queries {
#               syslog user;
#               severity info;
#       };
#       category queries { syslog_queries; };
#
#       # Log general name server errors to syslog.
#       channel syslog_errors {
#               syslog user;
#               severity error;
#       };
#       category default { syslog_errors;  };
#
#       # Don't log lame server messages.
#       category lame-servers { null; };
#};
# The following zone definitions don't need any modification.  The first one
# is the definition of the root name servers.  The second one defines
# localhost while the third defines the reverse lookup for localhost.

### root.hint contains all root-dns-server
zone "." in {
        type hint;
        file "root.hint";
};
zone "localhost" in {
        type master;
        file "localhost.zone";
};
zone "0.0.127.in-addr.arpa" in {
        type master;
        file "127.0.0.zone";
};
zone "0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.ip6.arpa" IN {
    type master;
    file "127.0.0.zone";
};
# Include the meta include file generated by createNamedConfInclude.  This
# includes all files as configured in NAMED_CONF_INCLUDE_FILES from
# /etc/sysconfig/named
include "/etc/named.conf.include";
# You can insert further zone records for your own domains below or create
# single files in /etc/named.d/ and add the file names to
# NAMED_CONF_INCLUDE_FILES.
# See /usr/share/doc/packages/bind/README.SUSE for more details.

#### let's checkout root.hint
suse:~ # vim /var/lib/named/root.hint

;       This file holds the information on root name servers needed to
;       initialize cache of Internet domain name servers
;       (e.g. reference this file in the "cache  .  "
;       configuration file of BIND domain name servers).
;
;       This file is made available by InterNIC
;       under anonymous FTP as
;           file                /domain/named.cache
;           on server           FTP.INTERNIC.NET
;       -OR-                    RS.INTERNIC.NET
;
;       last update:    Jan 3, 2013
;       related version of root zone:   2013010300
;
; formerly NS.INTERNIC.NET
;
.                        3600000  IN  NS    A.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
A.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     198.41.0.4
A.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      AAAA  2001:503:BA3E::2:30
;
; FORMERLY NS1.ISI.EDU
;
.                        3600000      NS    B.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
B.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     192.228.79.201
;
; FORMERLY C.PSI.NET
;
.                        3600000      NS    C.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
C.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     192.33.4.12
;
; FORMERLY TERP.UMD.EDU
;
.                        3600000      NS    D.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
D.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     199.7.91.13
D.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      AAAA  2001:500:2D::D
;
; FORMERLY NS.NASA.GOV
;
.                        3600000      NS    E.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
E.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     192.203.230.10
;
; FORMERLY NS.ISC.ORG
;
.                        3600000      NS    F.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
F.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     192.5.5.241
F.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      AAAA  2001:500:2F::F
;
; FORMERLY NS.NIC.DDN.MIL
;
.                        3600000      NS    G.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
G.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     192.112.36.4
;
; FORMERLY AOS.ARL.ARMY.MIL
;
.                        3600000      NS    H.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
H.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     128.63.2.53
H.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      AAAA  2001:500:1::803F:235
;
; FORMERLY NIC.NORDU.NET
;
.                        3600000      NS    I.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
I.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     192.36.148.17
I.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      AAAA  2001:7FE::53
;
; OPERATED BY VERISIGN, INC.
;
.                        3600000      NS    J.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
J.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     192.58.128.30
J.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      AAAA  2001:503:C27::2:30
;
; OPERATED BY RIPE NCC
;
.                        3600000      NS    K.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
K.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     193.0.14.129
K.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      AAAA  2001:7FD::1
;
; OPERATED BY ICANN
;
.                        3600000      NS    L.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
L.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     199.7.83.42
L.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      AAAA  2001:500:3::42
;
; OPERATED BY WIDE
;
.                        3600000      NS    M.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.
M.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      A     202.12.27.33
M.ROOT-SERVERS.NET.      3600000      AAAA  2001:DC3::35
; End of File

####### CentOS
vim /etc/named.conf
// named.conf
//
// Provided by Red Hat bind package to configure the ISC BIND named(8) DNS
// server as a caching only nameserver (as a localhost DNS resolver only).
//
// See /usr/share/doc/bind*/sample/ for example named configuration files.
//
// See the BIND Administrator's Reference Manual (ARM) for details about the
// configuration located in /usr/share/doc/bind-{version}/Bv9ARM.html
options {
        listen-on port 53 { 127.0.0.1; };
        listen-on-v6 port 53 { ::1; };
        directory       "/var/named";
        dump-file       "/var/named/data/cache_dump.db";
        statistics-file "/var/named/data/named_stats.txt";
        memstatistics-file "/var/named/data/named_mem_stats.txt";
        allow-query     { localhost; };
        /*
         - If you are building an AUTHORITATIVE DNS server, do NOT enable recursion.
         - If you are building a RECURSIVE (caching) DNS server, you need to enable
           recursion.
         - If your recursive DNS server has a public IP address, you MUST enable access
           control to limit queries to your legitimate users. Failing to do so will
           cause your server to become part of large scale DNS amplification
           attacks. Implementing BCP38 within your network would greatly
           reduce such attack surface
        */
        recursion yes;
        dnssec-enable yes;
        dnssec-validation yes;
        /* Path to ISC DLV key */
        bindkeys-file "/etc/named.iscdlv.key";
        managed-keys-directory "/var/named/dynamic";
        pid-file "/run/named/named.pid";
        session-keyfile "/run/named/session.key";
};
logging {
        channel default_debug {
                file "data/named.run";
                severity dynamic;
        };
};
zone "." IN {
        type hint;
        file "named.ca";
};
include "/etc/named.rfc1912.zones";
include "/etc/named.root.key";

# let's checkout the next included config file
vim /etc/named.rfc1912.zones

// named.rfc1912.zones:
//
// Provided by Red Hat caching-nameserver package
//
// ISC BIND named zone configuration for zones recommended by
// RFC 1912 section 4.1 : localhost TLDs and address zones
// and http://www.ietf.org/internet-drafts/draft-ietf-dnsop-default-local-zones-02.txt
// (c)2007 R W Franks
//
// See /usr/share/doc/bind*/sample/ for example named configuration files.
//
zone "localhost.localdomain" IN {
        type master;
        file "named.localhost";
        allow-update { none; };
};
zone "localhost" IN {
        type master;
        file "named.localhost";
        allow-update { none; };
};
zone "1.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0.ip6.arpa" IN {
        type master;
        file "named.loopback";
        allow-update { none; };
};
zone "1.0.0.127.in-addr.arpa" IN {
        type master;
        file "named.loopback";
        allow-update { none; };
};
zone "0.in-addr.arpa" IN {
        type master;
        file "named.empty";
        allow-update { none; };
};

# let's checkout the next included config file
vim /etc/named.root.key
managed-keys {
        # DNSKEY for the root zone.
        # Updates are published on root-dnssec-announce@icann.org
        . initial-key 257 3 8 "AwEAAagAIKlVZrpC6Ia7gEzahOR+9W29euxhJhVVLOyQbSEW0O8gcCjF FVQUTf6v58fLjwBd0YI0EzrAcQqBGCzh/RStIoO8g0NfnfL2MTJRkxoX bfDaUeVPQuYEhg37NZWAJQ9VnMVDxP/VHL496M/QZxkjf5/Efucp2gaD X6RS6CXpoY68LsvPVjR0ZSwzz1apAzvN9dlzEheX7ICJBBtuA6G3LQpz W5hOA2hzCTMjJPJ8LbqF6dsV6DoBQzgul0sGIcGOYl7OyQdXfZ57relS Qageu+ipAdTTJ25AsRTAoub8ONGcLmqrAmRLKBP1dfwhYB4N7knNnulq QxA+Uk1ihz0=";
};

DNS config file hosts – SUSE12/Centos7/Debian8.7

Debian 8.7 Manpage: hosts.man.txt

# files that exist even without bind
# /etc/hosts usually manual LAN-hosts ip<->name style
[root@centos ~]# cat /etc/hosts
127.0.0.1   localhost localhost.localdomain localhost4 localhost4.localdomain4
::1         localhost localhost.localdomain localhost6 localhost6.localdomain6

suse:~ #  cat /etc/hosts
#
# hosts         This file describes a number of hostname-to-address
#               mappings for the TCP/IP subsystem.  It is mostly
#               used at boot time, when no name servers are running.
#               On small systems, this file can be used instead of a
#               "named" name server.
# Syntax:
#
# IP-Address  Full-Qualified-Hostname  Short-Hostname
#
127.0.0.1       localhost
# special IPv6 addresses
::1             localhost ipv6-localhost ipv6-loopback
fe00::0         ipv6-localnet
ff00::0         ipv6-mcastprefix
ff02::1         ipv6-allnodes
ff02::2         ipv6-allrouters
ff02::3         ipv6-allhosts

root@debian:~# cat /etc/hosts
127.0.0.1       localhost
127.0.1.1       debian
# The following lines are desirable for IPv6 capable hosts
::1     localhost ip6-localhost ip6-loopback
ff02::1 ip6-allnodes
ff02::2 ip6-allrouters

DNS config file resov.conf – SUSE12/Centos7/Debian8.7

Debian8.7 Manpage: resolv.conf.man.txt

#### resolv.conf <- is automatically altered/changed by DHCP

root@debian:~# cat /etc/resolv.conf
domain domainname.local
search domainname.local
nameserver 172.20.0.2

[root@centos ~]# cat /etc/resolv.conf
# Generated by NetworkManager
search domainname.local
nameserver 172.20.0.2

DNS config file nsswitch.conf – SUSE12/Centos7/Debian8.7

Debian8.7 Manpage: nsswitch.conf.man.txt

[root@centos ~]# cat /etc/nsswitch.conf
#
# /etc/nsswitch.conf
#
# An example Name Service Switch config file. This file should be
# sorted with the most-used services at the beginning.
#
# The entry '[NOTFOUND=return]' means that the search for an
# entry should stop if the search in the previous entry turned
# up nothing. Note that if the search failed due to some other reason
# (like no NIS server responding) then the search continues with the
# next entry.
#
# Valid entries include:
#
#       nisplus                 Use NIS+ (NIS version 3)
#       nis                     Use NIS (NIS version 2), also called YP
#       dns                     Use DNS (Domain Name Service)
#       files                   Use the local files
#       db                      Use the local database (.db) files
#       compat                  Use NIS on compat mode
#       hesiod                  Use Hesiod for user lookups
#       [NOTFOUND=return]       Stop searching if not found so far
#
# To use db, put the "db" in front of "files" for entries you want to be
# looked up first in the databases
#
# Example:
#passwd:    db files nisplus nis
#shadow:    db files nisplus nis
#group:     db files nisplus nis
passwd:     files sss
shadow:     files sss
group:      files sss
#initgroups: files
#hosts:     db files nisplus nis dns
hosts:      files dns myhostname
# Example - obey only what nisplus tells us...
#services:   nisplus [NOTFOUND=return] files
#networks:   nisplus [NOTFOUND=return] files
#protocols:  nisplus [NOTFOUND=return] files
#rpc:        nisplus [NOTFOUND=return] files
#ethers:     nisplus [NOTFOUND=return] files
#netmasks:   nisplus [NOTFOUND=return] files
bootparams: nisplus [NOTFOUND=return] files
ethers:     files
netmasks:   files
networks:   files
protocols:  files
rpc:        files
services:   files sss
netgroup:   files sss
publickey:  nisplus
automount:  files
aliases:    files nisplus

suse:~ # cat /etc/nsswitch.conf
#
# /etc/nsswitch.conf
#
# An example Name Service Switch config file. This file should be
# sorted with the most-used services at the beginning.
#
# The entry '[NOTFOUND=return]' means that the search for an
# entry should stop if the search in the previous entry turned
# up nothing. Note that if the search failed due to some other reason
# (like no NIS server responding) then the search continues with the
# next entry.
#
# Legal entries are:
#
#       compat                  Use compatibility setup
#       nisplus                 Use NIS+ (NIS version 3)
#       nis                     Use NIS (NIS version 2), also called YP
#       dns                     Use DNS (Domain Name Service)
#       files                   Use the local files
#       [NOTFOUND=return]       Stop searching if not found so far
#
# For more information, please read the nsswitch.conf.5 manual page.
#
# passwd: files nis
# shadow: files nis
# group:  files nis
passwd: compat
group:  compat
hosts:          files dns
networks:       files dns
services:       files
protocols:      files
rpc:            files
ethers:         files
netmasks:       files
netgroup:       files nis
publickey:      files
bootparams:     files
automount:      files nis
aliases:        files

root@debian:~#  cat /etc/host.conf
multi on

[root@centos ~]# cat /etc/host.conf
multi on

suse:~ #  cat /etc/host.conf
#
# /etc/host.conf - resolver configuration file
#
# Please read the manual page host.conf(5) for more information.
#
#
# The following option is only used by binaries linked against
# libc4 or libc5. This line should be in sync with the "hosts"
# option in /etc/nsswitch.conf.
#
order hosts, bind
#
# The following options are used by the resolver library:
#
multi on

Links:

https://bugs.isc.org/

https://wiki.ubuntuusers.de/DNS-Server_Bind/

http://www.silicon.de/41638648/android-malware-switcher-hackt-wlan-router-und-aendert-das-dns/

https://www.welivesecurity.com/deutsch/2017/02/28/dns-attacken-fake-webseiten/

http://thesprawl.org/projects/dnschef/

IETF 99, Prague: There’s a lot going on in the DNS

Tweets:

admin