reboot

reboot; # simply reboots the system ;)
init 6; # does the same
telinit 6; #
shutdown -r now; # "standard" way

shutdown -r +1 "the system is going to reboot in one minute"; # "standard" timed way of reboot

systemctl reboot

systemctl isolate reboot.target

shutdown -rF +1 "rebooting in one minute to check filesytem"; # is supposed to check your filesystem on reboot - nothing in the manual about that

shutdown -rf +1 "rebooting WITHOUT filesytem check";

shutdown

init 0; # shortest way, is also completely valid way to powerdown your system - does not force-kill any processes AFAIK

telinit 0;

shutdown -h now; # "standard" way

shutdown -h +1 "the system is going to shutdown in one minute"; # "standard" timed way of shutdown

systemctl isolate runlevel0.target

systemctl isolate poweroff.target

telinit is /sbin/telinit

„telinit may be used to change the SysV system runlevel. Since the concept of SysV runlevels is obsolete the runlevel requests will be transparently translated into systemd unit activation requests.“

telinit.man.txt

init is /sbin/init

„systemd, init – systemd system and service manager“

init.man.txt

reboot is /sbin/reboot

halt, poweroff, reboot – Halt, power-off or reboot the machine

reboot.man.txt

shutdown is /sbin/shutdown

shutdown – Halt, power-off or reboot the machine

shutdown.man.txt

systemctl ist /usr/bin/systemctl

systemctl may be used to introspect and control the state of the „systemd“ system and service manager. Please refer to systemd(1) for an introduction into the basic concepts and functionality this tool manages.

systemctl.man.txt

wall

wall „hello world“

is a nice way to send messages to other logged in users. (kind of group chat – don’t spam em :-D)

it seems like suse12 the wall message is only written to other user’s console – not your own-root console.

admin