well yes ok take 15min… or 30min…

Snowden has used it: Why this is important

Recent government spying revelations have shown us how hard real privacy is to achieve, and how little of our information is really safe.

GnuPG is one of the few tools that can offer real protection.

Yet it remains popular primarily in only hi-tech circles, despite it’s availability on Windows, Mac, and Gnu Linux, its ease of use, and the fact it’s free of charge.

We need to introduce new people to GnuPG and help them to start emailing safely and privately – the new GnuPG website will play an key role in making strong crypto desirable and accessible.

Why is strong privacy so important?

Faith in the privacy of our communications is necessary for:

– Guarding trade secrets
– Meaningful and fair negotiations
– Protection and advancement of human rights
– Academic exploration and development
– Political freedom and democracy
– Proper development from to adulthood – childish mistakes belong in the past

What makes GnuPG so secure?

It’s Free Software – anyone can inspect its source code and check for back doors, and security experts frequently do. It’s made by leading experts who were originally chosen by the German Government for their aptitude. It’s build on rock solid cryptography principles that have been adopted industry-wide, and uses the OpenPGP Open Standard for compatiblity with other applications. It’s so widely used that hundreds of companies have a vested interest in checking that it works the way it should. Unfortunately that doesn’t mean they choose to donate to the project or support it in other ways. And it’s even used by Phil Zimmerman, father of strong email and voice over IP encryption.

https://en.goteo.org/project/gnupg-new-website-and-infrastructure

If you are using GnuPG to secure your data – either on server based systems or for example by email applications on the desktop – it is in your own interest to keep this software alive and well maintained. You can help GnuPG and thus yourself by:

src: https://g10code.com/

if you wanna send them an encrypted mail look here: http://werner.eifelkommune.de/mykey.asc

IT WILL NOT ENCRYPT THE „FROM“, „TO“ AND „SUBJECT“ HEADER PARTS OF AN EMAIL… UNFORTUNATELY THIS CAN NOT BE DONE. (E-MAIL IS A VERY BROKEN SYSTEM)
IT WILL ONLY ENCRYPT THE BODY AND ATTACHMENTS OF AN MAIL! NOT THE SUBJECT! DO NOT WRITE ANYTHING IMPROTANT INTO THE SUBJECT – JUST WRITE „SELLERIE“.

In short: PGP works with 3 files

pair of keys:

1. public (pub.asc) (distribute that on the net)
2. private (pub-sec.asc) (keep that file private e.g. on a truecrypt encrypted container on a usb stick that you wear with you or store away savely)

3. revocation certificate (rev.asc)

you will generate all three in the following process.

PGP Concept:

if you encrypt something (mail, file) with your public key – it can ONLY be decrypted with your private key.

This is why NSA wants to get quantum computers so they can crack that too.

The public key goes public – on your website – attached to your mails or you can upload it to a keyserver, where people can download it again and encrypt mails that they want to send to you.

mine looks like that:

-----BEGIN PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----
Version: GnuPG v2
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=Z+RW
-----END PGP PUBLIC KEY BLOCK-----

There will be a third file called „revocation certificate“ that you can use to disable your public key – in case someone stole your private key and it’s not safe anymore to send you encrypted mails with that key.

We will go through that later.

With PGP the NSA can still see who communicates with who (meta-data) but can not mass-analyse content.

You can set this up pretty fast.

1. get and install PGP Plugin

uname -a; # tested with
Linux debian 3.16.0-4-686-pae #1 SMP Debian 3.16.36-1+deb8u1 (2016-09-03) i686 GNU/Linux

# under debian linux this works as easy as
apt-get update;
apt-get install pgp; # should install gnupg

gpg --version; # check version
gpg (GnuPG) 1.4.18
Copyright (C) 2014 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
...

2. get and install icedove/thunderbird

# under debian linux this works as easy as

apt-get update;
apt-get install icedove; # rebranded version of thunderbird

icedove-version

3. install a little older version of the Enigmail Addon, because the newer one gives ugly errors (under Debian8 jessie 3.16 kernel and icedove 45.2) like this:

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons-setup-wizard-screenshot-test-pgp-encrypted-mail2

the older version of Enigmail 1.8.2 works like a charm with this setup.

Download it from here: https://addons.mozilla.org/thunderbird/downloads/file/310358/enigmail-1.8.2-sm+tb.xpi?src=version-history

or download mirror: http://dwaves.de/software/enigmail-1.8.2-sm+tb.xpi

sha25sha256sum enigmail-1.8.2-sm+tb.xpi
3dfd29a12fc36c5780574bdab67fb61d63e65e67671d14921749187f7af1639f enigmail-1.8.2-sm+tb.xpi; #should be in any case like this, no matter from where you downloaded.

4. Start icedove/thunderbird:

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons

5. drag and drop the enigmail-1.8.2-sm+tb.xpi into the whitespace of your addon window of thunderbird/icedove.

install-enigmail-in-thunderbird-icedove2 install-enigmail-in-thunderbird-icedove

MAKE SHURE TO DISABLE AUTO UPDATES! OR YOU WILL END UP WITH A BROKEN VERSION 1.9.XX IN A MATTER OF SECONDS 😀

you can safely click on „Install“ after 3 seconds…

you will have to hit „restart now“ button to restart icedove to activate the plugin.

6. You will have new menu options „Enigmail“ -> if you do not have yet any PGP keys click on „Setup Wizard“ will guide you through the process…

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons-setup-wizard-screenshot

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons-setup-wizard-screenshot2

key-generation

create-revocation-certificate

save the revocation certificate on the truecrypt container on your usb stick that you later put into your save…

export-backup-keys-to-file

backup / export your keys to the truecrypt container on your usb stick that you later put into your save…

you will have to click „Export Keys to File“ twice, once for your private key, second for your public key…

you will have to give a passphrase that unlocks your private key whenever you have to decrypt messages that were encrypted with the public key of your key-pair.

7. if you already have some PGP keys that you would like to use: (and savely stored away on some truecrypt encrypted usb stick)

you might want to import them this way:

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons-setup-wizard-screenshot-import-keys-wizard

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons-setup-wizard-screenshot-import-keys-wizard2

you do this twice:

  1. first select your public key: „Your Name admin2@dwaves.de (0xEA1994CC) pub.asc“ file and hit import. You should have a new entry in your list of available public keys.
  2. you again go import keys from file and import your private key „Your Name admin2@dwaves.de (0xEA1994CC) pub-sec.asc“ and now the entry in the list turns bold-black.

DO NOT SELECT YOUR REVOCATION CERTIFICATE! OR YOU WILL REVOKE YOUR KEYPAIR IMMEDATELY (WITHOUT BEEING ASKED).

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons-setup-wizard-screenshot-setup-mail-account-to-use-pgp3

you now have successfully imported all your files and you could publish your public key to a keyserver like pool.sks-keyservers.net:

icedove-thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-upload-key-to-keyserver

so people can conveniently download it again and have not to search all over the internet.

 

8. click on the „three stripes“ on the very top right -> Preferences -> Account Settings

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons-setup-wizard-screenshot-setup-mail-account-to-use-pgp_

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons-setup-wizard-screenshot-setup-mail-account-to-use-pgp

click on „Select Key“

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons-setup-wizard-screenshot-setup-mail-account-to-use-pgp4

9. test if you can send yourself an encrypted message and decrypt it again.

chose-to-encrypt-and-sign-message-enigmail-in-thunderbird-icedove2

and hit on send, you will be asked for your passphrase which is used to unlock your private key to encrypt the message. (same on decryption)

TADA!

encrypted-key-received

If you hit Ctrl/Strg+U (Source View)

you can see how the NSA Agent from the Matrix would see your message:

WARNING: THE SUBJECT AND HEADER ARE SEND IN CLEAR-TEXT!!!!

ONLY THE MESSAGE CONTENT/ATTACHMENT IS ENCRYPTED!!!

THIS IS NOT A BUG!!! IT’S A „FEATURE“ 😀

Return-path: <admin2@dwaves.de>
Envelope-to: admin2@dwaves.de
Delivery-date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 20:31:06 +0200
Received: from [46.182.143.67] (helo=[192.168.178.75])
by dwaves.de with esmtpsa (TLS1.2:ECDHE_RSA_AES_128_GCM_SHA256:128)
(Exim 4.84_2)
(envelope-from <admin2@dwaves.de>)
id 1bnVFa-0001hX-Kc
for admin2@dwaves.de; Fri, 23 Sep 2016 20:31:06 +0200
To: <admin2@dwaves.de>
From: <admin2@dwaves.de>
Subject: this is an encrypted message
Date: Fri, 23 Sep 2016 20:31:05 +0200
User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (X11; Linux i686; rv:45.0) Gecko/20100101
Icedove/45.2.0
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/encrypted;
protocol="application/pgp-encrypted";
boundary="oxxvFWgDDrn5xwiSmRHIvAjA3W5NX3ird"

This is an OpenPGP/MIME encrypted message (RFC 4880 and 3156)
--oxxvFWgDDrn5xwiSmRHIvAjA3W5NX3ird
Content-Type: application/pgp-encrypted
Content-Description: PGP/MIME version identification

Version: 1

--oxxvFWgDDrn5xwiSmRHIvAjA3W5NX3ird
Content-Type: application/octet-stream; name="encrypted.asc"
Content-Description: OpenPGP encrypted message
Content-Disposition: inline; filename="encrypted.asc"

-----BEGIN PGP MESSAGE-----
Version: GnuPG v2
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=KsRr
-----END PGP MESSAGE-----

--oxxvFWgDDrn5xwiSmRHIvAjA3W5NX3ird--

as stated here: https://enigmail.wiki/Signature_and_Encryption

One important point concerns mail header security. Mail headers cannot be encrypted, nor included in the signature computation. This includes also the Subject mail header. Therefore, do not write any sensitive information in the Subject when sending an encrypted message.

Signature and encryption applies to the mail body only –- and also to attachments, if you chose so. That is, when you sign a message, no mail header (such as the Subject, Date, all Received headers, etc.) can be included in the signature. Also, when you encrypt a message, mail headers are not encrypted.

Revoke your certificate

If you have the feeling someone compromised your system and stole your private key.

You can revoke your public key.

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons-setup-wizard-screenshot-import-keys-wizard

thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-addons-setup-wizard-screenshot-import-keys-wizard2

this time select your revocation certificate file ending with: rev.asc

it get’s imported and you can r-click on your key and click -> revoke key.

Now it reminds you to also upload your local changes to the keyservers you previously uploaded your public key to make the revocation of your key public.

Thanks for taking the time.

icedove-thunderbird-enigmail-pgp-revoce-certificate-key

this tutorial video was taken down… for whatever reason: https://www.youtube.com/embed/bakOKJFtB-k

Nice Video that explains: How PGP Works (german):

SCARY ERROR MESSAGE:

Enigmail Security Info

Decrypted message

Error – no matching private/secret key found to decrypt message

gpg: WARNING: The GNOME keyring manager hijacked the GnuPG agent.

gpg: WARNING: GnuPG will not work properly – please configure that tool to not interfere with the GnuPG system!
gpg: encrypted with 2048-bit RSA key, ID XXXXXXXX, created
„“
gpg: encrypted with 4096-bit RSA key, ID XXXXXXXX, created
„“
gpg: no valid OpenPGP data found.
gpg: block_filter 0xb78984d0: read error (size=5229,a->size=3181)
gpg: block_filter 0xb7897fe8: read error (size=10198,a->size=6102)

gpg: WARNING: encrypted message has been manipulated!

gpg: block_filter: pending bytes!

gpg: block_filter: pending bytes!

Note: The message is encrypted for the following User ID’s / Keys:

0xXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (Kali Linux Repository <devel@kali.org>),

0xXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (Kali Linux Repository <devel@kali.org>)

https://wiki.gnupg.org/GnomeKeyring

https://lists.gnupg.org/pipermail/gnupg-devel/2014-August/028689.html

Related links:

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Latest articles from Kristian’s personal blog (RSS)

This website provides services for the SKS keyservers used by OpenPGP. A pool of keyservers is available at hkp://pool.sks-keyservers.net Information about the other variants of the pool is found in the overview.

If you wish to contact me feel free to send an email to the user id in the key 0x94CBAFDD30345109561835AA0B7F8B60E3EDFAE3

The HKP Pool

Read about the various pools

Keyserver statuses

Status information about the different keyservers can be found at the status pages

Interact with the keyservers

A simple way to interact with the keyservers is available at the interaction pages

The number of OpenPGP Keys

A chart showing the development in the number of OpenPGP keys by day. This is the maximum number of keys found on the keyserver at the start of any given day.

This site is developed and hosted by KF (Kristian Fiskerstrand) Webs

Amazing Stuff: Werner Koch

Werner started GnuPG in 1997 and still puts most of his working time into the development and maintenance of GnuPG. He has 29 years experience in commercial software development on systems ranging from CP/M systems to mainframes, languages from assembler to Smalltalk and applications from drivers to financial analysis systems. Werner is a long time free software supporter and co-founder of the FSFE. With the support of his brother he founded g10code GmbH in 2001 to make GnuPG development his profession. Werner is full time employed by g10code.

src: https://www.gnupg.org/people/

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Werner Koch

Koch in 2015.

Born July 11, 1961 (age 55)
Residence Erkrath, Germany
Nationality German
Occupation Software developer
Known for GNU Privacy Guard
Website werner.eifelkommune.de

Werner Koch (born July 11, 1961) is a German free software developer.[1] He is best known as the principal author of the GNU Privacy Guard (GnuPG or GPG).[2] He was also Head of Office and German Vice-Chancellor of the Free Software Foundation Europe. He is the winner of Award for the Advancement of Free Software in 2015 for founding GnuPG.[3]

Journalists and security professionals rely on GnuPG, and Edward Snowden used it to evade monitoring whilst he leaked classified information from the U.S. National Security Agency.[4]

Life and work

Koch lives in Erkrath, near Düsseldorf, Germany. He began writing GNU Privacy Guard in 1997, inspired by attending a talk by Richard Stallman who made a call for someone to write a replacement for Phil Zimmermann’s Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) which was subject to U.S. export restrictions.[2] The first release of GNU Privacy Guard was in 1999 and it went on to become the basis for most of the popular email encryption programs: GPGTools, Enigmail, and Koch’s own Gpg4win, the primary free encryption program for Microsoft Windows.[2]

In 1999 Koch, via the German Unix User Group which he served on the board of,[2] received a grant of 318,000 marks (about $170,000 US) from the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology to make GPG compatible with Microsoft Windows.[1] In 2005 he received a contract from the German government to support the development of S/MIME.

Journalists and security professionals rely on GnuPG, and Edward Snowden used it to evade monitoring whilst he leaked classified information from the U.S. National Security Agency.[4] Despite GnuPG’s popularity, Koch has struggled to survive financially, earning about $25,000 US per year since 2001[2] and thus considered abandoning the project and taking a better paying programming job.[4] However, given Snowden’s leaked documents showed the extent of NSA surveillance, Koch continued.[4] In 2014 he held a funding drive and in response received $137,000 US in donations from the public,[2] and Facebook and Stripe each pledged to annually donate $50,000 US to GPG development.[2][5] Unrelated, in 2015 Koch was also awarded a one-time grant of $60,000 US from the Linux Foundation’s Core Infrastructure Initiative.[5][6]

References

 

 

  1. Zemlin, Jim (8 February 2015). „Answering the Call for Werner Koch’s Everywhere“. Linux Foundation. Retrieved 28 July 2015.

External links

David Shaw

Master of the classic branch

David approached the GnuPG Project in 2002 after the relaxing of the US crypto regulation allowed the participation of US based hackers on international crypto projects. One of his first achievements was a much improved Web-of-Trust implementation. Today he mainly takes responsibility for the keyserver access and the classic GnuPG 1.x branch.

Marcus Brinkmann

Hacker emeritus

Marcus is part of the free software community since 1997, when he joined the Debian project. Probably best known for his past work on GNU/Hurd, he also has a diploma degree in mathematics, and was employed by g10code to work on the GnuPG and related software from 2001 to 2012.

NIIBE Yutaka

Smartcards and Libgcrypt

Niibe is a long time free software hacker who joined the GnuPG project in 2011 and soon took over the development of the smartcard related code. He is also the person behind the Gnuk Token and the MEP game. Niibe’s work on GnuPG is financially supported by g10code.

Jussi Kivilinna

Optimization

Jussi joined the GnuPG project in 2012 and worked since then on assembler optimized code for cryptographic algorithms in Libgcrypt.

Neal Walfied

Core components hacker

Neal started to work on GnuPG in 2015 to support maintenance and development in all areas. He is full time employed by g10code.

Kai Michaelis

Enigmail hacker

Kai is working on the Enigmail project since 2015. He is part time employed by g10code.

Justus Winter

Core components hacker

Justus started to work on GnuPG in 2015 to support maintenance and development in all areas. He is full time employed by g10code.

PRIVACY FOR THE WEAK – TRANSPARENCY FOR THE POWERFUL!

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Aufklärungsfilm: Datenschutz – fast wie Sex

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